Business

If you want to succeed, your reputation is the first step

There is no need to exaggerate the value of a company’s reputation. The best promotion weapon you have is the word of mouth of your consumers, whether potential or current. Meanwhile, scandals and criticism have the potential to bankrupt businesses. When emotions are high during times of crisis, and any misstep can lead to a full-blown scandal, reputation becomes even more essential.

The internet has just enhanced its reputation: news and rumours travel quickly, but they travel much quicker on social media (and reach more people).

Who among us hasn’t read product reviews before buying anything or looking into a brand after seeing a friend gushing about it on social media? People are talking about you online, sharing their opinions on social media, and giving reviews on sites. cannabis SEO company or a company that specializes in Marijuana PR is tough. Cannabis is a smokin’ business and getting cannabis PR for your projects is often tougher. CBD, hemp, medicinal marijuana, and recreational marijuana generate news in every sector of the media, including politics, finance, health, wellness, cosmetics, and fashion. Imperium Group partners with leading cannabis influencers, cannabis industry conferences and hemp trade shows. Knowledge Panels are also very important.

elk and others, regardless of the size of your company.

It’s a mistake to conceive of your online reputation as independent from your offline or “real-world” reputation: With over three billion social media users, your online reputation is simply your reputation, and it influences both online and offline purchasing decisions.

Most firms already engage in some form of online reputation management (ORM), such as responding to customer comments and tagging them in posts. However, to make your reputation crisis-proof, you’ll need a solid procedure, which is precisely what this post is about. These techniques can improve a current ORM workflow or create a new one from the start.

Before you begin reading your internet reviews, you must first create some ground rules. These will assist you and your team in determining whether to respond to reviews, how to reply responsibly and fast, and how to react in the event of a reputation crisis. This procedure can be as detailed as you like based on how well you and your team communicate, but here are some questions to consider while determining the guidelines:

How quickly should you respond? Naturally, the faster your reaction, the better, but it’s a good idea to set a minimum response time requirement for your team members.

What level of transparency are you willing to go to? When responding to a customer, this will help you decide if you want to go into all the details or simply reassure them that you’re working on the problem. Customers value transparency, as seen by recent trends.

Which voice tone should you use? Of course, this is dependent on your brand. Is it better to be friendly or professional and direct? Are you able to tell jokes? A witty answer to a complaint can often go viral. Oatley, for example, is one of the firms that heavily leverages unfavourable evaluations in its marketing, ironically. Would it, however, be consistent with your brand’s image?

In the event of a crisis, who will be the spokesperson(s)? Who will make official remarks on behalf of your company if the necessity arises? Is it the CEO of the public relations manager? If you’re seeking to develop genuine relationships with customers, you can choose an answer based on your company’s image.

Is it necessary to automate your responses? Automation allows you to respond in seconds and save money on employees, but can you be sure it won’t irritate your customers? After trying to solve their problem on Twitter and receiving the same prepared reply from Amazon, the consumer in the case below became frustrated.

Is it necessary to answer all the time? The “always answer rule” is something several firms take pride in, and it’s essential for smaller businesses – the more engagement you have, the higher your brand visibility, especially on social media. However, if you begin to receive a large number of mentions all at once, you may need to start prioritizing. Furthermore, poor reviews may occasionally devolve into trolling, and if there’s one thing to learn on the internet, it’s “Don’t feed the trolls.”

Related Articles

Leave a Reply


Back to top button